Desires of a Backup System by Bob Hyatt

You invited me to write more on this topic. I believe I will do so, but in parts, rather than in a 20 page university paper. I will start with an overview of the ‘desired’ home server backup, vs what seems to be available.

For most homes and small businesses, the primary desires / goals are (in my view):

A. secure backups. In this case I add, secure from failure for at least 5 years!

B. Easy to do backups. I do NOT mean automatically scheduled backups. They automatically back up things you are NOT interested in. Or that will be useless to you if there is a problem. For example, do you really want to back up all the Operating System files, settings, etc. Things that change a lot, and will occupy a lot of space on your backup drives? I do NOT.

C. Allow you to determine what is important to You!
Not every photo or video is important to you. Not every PDF is valuable to you. Not every MP3 or FLAC is valuable to you. So you need a way to differentiate between valued and chaff. And for the ‘tool’ to remember. OR for you to keep the data you want to keep separately from the chaff. Then have the ‘tool’ look only at the desired data.

D. Allow you to add storage, as needed, easily. Adding a new hard drive should not be ‘a hope and a prayer’ kind of task.

E. If I should desire to change from one backup product or tools to another, the existing should NOT act as a barrier or gatekeeper. (as in keeping your data as prisoner).

F. The running of the backup device or server should NOT wear out the disks, ever! The issue with the video I described in the earlier ‘letter’ here was that the one always busy was attempting to make the ‘distribution’ of data on the drives “perfect”.

If you are a corporation or a government agency, such wearing out of the disks would be considered ‘cost of doing business’. And they have the budget for this task. A home user or a small office does NOT have a budget for this willful destruction. Further, “Perfect distribution” is NOT what a home user or small office is looking for. They are looking for a safe place to put their data, and the exact location is not important.

Home or small business users will seldom read the backups. Perhaps, not ‘seldom’. But the reality is you will do plenty of writes to update the backup. In some cases you might do more reads (if you share the data with media players, other computers on your network, etc).

One more difference between the products that are most sold in this arena? Large organizations are also looking for quick access to the data. E.g. The usage of this kind of thing is for ‘backup or archival’ purposes for the home and small business, whereas the large organizations are using the data put onto such a device as production data and they expect lots of access and lots of updates.

SAN and / or NAS systems in the large organizations are for processing production data, not for backups. So you begin the issues with a fundamental difference in the use of these devices. This is partly why the components tend to be expensive.

The good news for the home or small business is the time tested components used by the large organizations, while expensive, are likely to last longer than your need.

If I get some feedback on this introduction, I will introduce ‘task vs tool’ in the next ‘letter’ I write.

One thought on “Desires of a Backup System by Bob Hyatt

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