Monthly Archives: May 2014

The Joy of Reading (21st century style)

I decided to read a science fiction novel.  Not a unique occurrence, as I have thousands of them in boxes and storage and shelves.  And that’s the problem, really.  Hard drive space is already increasing faster than my reading pace, so I could store books electronically and add to them indefinitely and keep the same physical volume.

Now I’m already well practiced with using my original Nook reader.  After downloading the file, I would next import it into calibre, not just to keep track of it but to massage the data.  But first it tells me that my version is woefully out of date and I go download and install the latest, which offers many improvements and rearranges the controls.

The book’s file is a bit strange, it seems, as it was not importing right.  Easiest thing is just to load it in Sigil instead (though I suppose I could figure out the import options or use new features to edit the files and not need Sigil anymore for its use in later steps) and save it again.

A first look at the formatted ebook is fair; I’ve seen much worse from some publishers.  Why can’t they do as well as, say, Project Gutenberg, and just put the text in a file?  But I digress.  I fire up calibre’s “heuristic” processing to clean up all the junk, and use its formatting features to optimize the file for my device’s liking and my reading preferences.  Ah, but that’s set for Nook.  Well, a new software reader probably doesn’t have as many peculiar issues as an old dedicated reader, so I probably don’t need that anymore.  Generic output profile to start with, but still specify traditional print-style rendering where paragraphs are indented on the first line as opposed to having double vertical space between them.  Margins and other stuff should be taken care of by the reader software.

Normally this is where I then load the resulting file into Sigil and see if there are any bizzare features that can be fixed with a simple global search-and-replace on the HTML source, if that is still necessary.  At the least I’ll manually retouch the css file to delete stuff that ought to be unspecified so the reader doesn’t feel it’s being bossed around, and get rid of the text-align: justify line since that doesn’t work as well on the old low-resolution e-paper display.  It looks better if the horizontal spacing is optimized for letterform appearance and not also trying to get a specific length too.

On the Nook, I then plugged in the USB cable (which was charging anyway) and had calibre export to it.  But how do I read it on the Android tablet?  USB filesystem hasn’t worked for a few years now and it’s futile to try.  It doesn’t have SMB file networking built in, but there are apps for that.  I know I’ve tried a fancy file manager that includes network access, and it doesn’t work.  I use the network plug-in for the well-regarded Midnight Commander port, and it doesn’t work.  I tried a few more programs, and nothing could get past the names of the file shares, if it got that far at all.  Must be some “security” thing?

Next I try a couple features in calibre.  One is wireless device access, and I’m not sure what that does, but a couple readers and stand-alone programs allow the Android device to use it, it seems.  Well, I can’t get anything to do anything with that.  The other feature is better:  a web server interface.  It tells me the local IP address and port, so I make that into a URL and feed it to Firefox.  Success!  It lets me browse the book collection on the Android tablet, and download files via HTTP.  So, now I have the book file on the tablet.

Next question:  which reader software?  A Google search turns up a few reviews.  Mostly they don’t address the features I’m looking for, or any real features pertaining to the core function of reading stuff presented on the screen.  I don’t care which stores they are integrated with, or how pretty the book chooser screen looks and all the skeuomorphisms present.  A shame that “able to load files on local storage” is a feature that needs to be checked for!  The supplied Google Play Read for example, has its collection of things you bought from them, and no way to point to an actual file.

I end up trying two, and spend the rest of the afternoon figuring out how to make it dance with the song I sing for it.  I’m glad to say that I had success in setting font appearance and size, getting the line spacing to look right, having it show margins rather than printing all the way to the edge of the screen, and so on.

The page is looking quite presentable.  I do mean “looks”, since I haven’t actually read the first page yet.  That’s a chore for next weekend.  It does seem like a lot of effort for a book I’m not going to like anyway, but that’s why I wanted to save five bucks for a remaindered copy plus shipping.